In A Changing Climate: Foreword by Edward McDonnell

The Greenbelt Foundation is launching a new series exploring how our daily lives are impacted by the changing climate, the role of the Greenbelt in helping us to adapt, and how residents can take climate action. Our CEO Edward McDonnell shares his reflections on the series below.

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Our Role in the Public Process

Ontario’s Greenbelt has become a topic of discussion in the provincial election. It has been heartwarming to see so many people discussing the importance of the Greenbelt to the health and prosperity of Ontario and communicating their support for its protection.

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Meet Ed McDonnell

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Last October, Ed McDonnell joined the team at the Greenbelt Foundation as our new CEO. On the occasion of his 4-month anniversary and the Greenbelt's 13th birthday, Ed answered a few questions about himself and his vision for the Greenbelt.

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Fond Farewell from our CEO Burkhard Mausberg

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Twelve years ago, the government passed the Greenbelt Act in response to pressure from environmental groups to permanently protect vital farmland and natural systems at risk of being paved over for suburban sprawl. Now, over a decade later, as I prepare to leave the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation, I am as determined as ever to ensure the Greenbelt remains a successful and permanent feature of the landscape. 

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Farewell to our friend Dan McDermott

It is with great sorrow that I inform you that Dan McDermott—a dedicated, long-time environmental advocate—passed away last week at a Toronto hospital, after battling an illness. Dan was a Greenbelt Foundation grantee with Sierra Club Ontario, and served as a steering committee member for the Ontario Greenbelt Alliance. He will be missed by the many people who had the pleasure of working with him over his 30 year career.

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Burkhard's Blog: Getting the suburbs on track for a liveable, affordable region

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Photo courtesy of the City of Vaughan via Ryerson report 

The GTHA is having a moment – that’s the finding of a new report out from the Ryerson City Building Institute. The report, “Suburbs on Track”, argues that with $32 billion in new transit spending planned as part of the Big Move, planning policies need to adapt to encourage smart growth along these corridors, especially in suburban communities.

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Burkhard's Blog: Keeping our computers humming

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Our IT Manager Jason is a nerd - in the best possible way. He doesn’t seek the limelight or glory; instead he focuses his efforts on ensuring our technological environment works efficiently. 

He makes sure every computer is optimized, staff are trained on the software installed, does backup upon backup upon backup, and ensures we are connected at all times.

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Burkhard's Blog: Population forecasts cause havoc with growth planning

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Land-use policies and growth forecasts are subjects that often lead to yawning, bewilderment and deep sleep. But they’re also central to determining the future of our neighbourhoods, our towns and cities, and our rural areas.  It’s a bit like going to the dentist.  You may not like it but have to do it.

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Burkhard's Blog: Re-Examining the need for a highway…

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Photo by Michael Gil via Flickr

Recently Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca suspended the Environmental Assessment for a highway known as the GTA West or “The 413.”  The 413 would curve south-west from the 400 at King-Vaughan Road and meet the 407 and 401 roughly at Winston Churchill Blvd.  It would have to cross the Greenbelt several times to get there.

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Burkhard's Blog: Ted Arnott's Green Legacy Programme

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One thing you’ll notice about the Greenbelt – whether you’re walking, cycling or driving – is the immense numbers of trees. In fact the Greenbelt is home to an estimated 200 million trees, and they do a lot more than provide a shady place to rest.

The Greenbelt’s forests capture and filter water, absorb air pollution, support crop pollination, and store and sequester carbon. These ‘eco-services’ are worth an estimated $1 billion – and the trees provide them for free.

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