Halton

Halton

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Fall in love with Halton Region as you cycle along the cliffs of the Niagara Escarpment and onto the rolling hills of the Oak Ridges Moraine.  Soak in the rich history, as the Greenbelt Route carries you through the beautiful Town of Halton Hills, renowned for its rolling terrain.  There is plenty to see and do as you drop into the charming communities of Acton and Georgetown.  Be sure to pay a visit to the historic lime kilns in the community of Limehouse too.

Halton is also home to a lush tree canopy, bold-faced cliffs, hidden caves, glacial deposits, and year-round camping at some of the most spectacular spots in all of southern Ontario.  Be sure to meander off the Greenbelt Route to check out one of the region’s Greenbelt Walks.  These walks can lead to you stunning views from Rattlesnake Point Conservation Area, or to the reconstructed 15th century Iroquoian village at Crawford Lake, where excavations have uncovered 11 longhouses and various artefacts.

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Take half a day to clamber around at Mount Nemo, where you will be surrounded by extensive forest cover and one of the best cliff-edge ecosystems in the province.  On a clear day, take in the panoramic view of rolling countrysides down to Lake Ontario and Toronto’s CN Tower.

TIP: Turn off the route for a peek into Carlisle, boasting patios, a bakery, and home of Dutchman’s Gold honey.  A sweet little town, and one of many along this section of the Greenbelt Route.

TIP: The lime kilns around Limehouse are best accessed through the Limehouse Conservation Area.  The huge stone blocks spring out of the forest like a prehistoric ruin.  The kiln was used for burning dolostone to create lime, a vital ingredient for early industrial and agricultural purposes.

TIP: Glen Williams is a picturesque hamlet with multiple bridges that cross the Credit River.  Pick up something to read at the local bookstore and take a break at the coffee shop.  It’s also worth taking the time to visit Glen Williams Glass, where you can observe the glassblowing process and learn about the various techniques and styles of its seven members.

TIP: Located in Milton at the base of the Niagara Escarpment, the Mattamy National Cycling Centre is a great place to start an adventure on the Greenbelt Route.  The only velodrome of its kind in Canada, it serves as both a community recreation facility and a venue for provincial, national and international events.  Meet your friends at the café here, and have your bikes checked at the on-site bike shop before you set out.

TIP: The Halton Pumpkin Trail runs throughout the entire month of October, connecting and promoting the fabulous array of fall products and events on offer in Halton Region.  Pay a visit to participating farmers’ markets, restaurants, local attractions, and accommodations for an unforgettable experience.

TIP: Country Heritage Park is site for the 2015 Harvest Halton.  Rain or shine, they have you covered.  Your entrance fee will give you access to more than 30 Historical Exhibit Buildings.

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Additional Information and Resources

Our True Nature - Adventure tourism information

Hamilton Halton Brant - Visitor information

Town of Halton Hills - Visitor information

Halton Region - Cycling map and information

Ontario By Bike - Certified bicycle-friendly businesses, information, and maps

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Burkhard's Blog: Ted Arnott's Green Legacy Programme

posted in CEO Blog | Jul 06, 2016

One thing you’ll notice about the Greenbelt – whether you’re walking, cycling or driving – is the immense numbers of trees. In fact the Greenbelt is home to an estimated 200 million trees, and they do a lot more than provide a shady place to rest. The Greenbelt’s forests capture and filter water, absorb air pollution, support crop pollination, and store and sequester carbon. These ‘eco-services’ are worth an estimated $1 billion – and the trees provide them for free.

By entering my email above I consent to receive emails containing information about the Greenbelt and the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation. I may revoke my consent by unsubscribing.