Hamilton

Hamilton

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The City of Hamilton is home to more than 100 incredible waterfalls and cascades.  Many of these marvels of nature are just steps from the Greenbelt Route, as it winds through the Niagara Escarpment.  Pedalling from Hamilton, you’ll experience scenic vistas from the top of the escarpment, lakes, Carolinian forests, and a vibrant community that is renewing its relationship with a natural environment that really sets this community apart.

Nestled between Lake Ontario and the Niagara Escarpment, the Greenbelt Route weaves through the Dundas Valley and past a number of spectacular trails.  It’s just a short ride to downtown Hamilton or Dundas from here, where several urban treasures can be found.  Or you can visit the Royal Botanical Gardens’ Cootes Paradise, where nature lovers can access a 320 hectare river-mouth marsh, glacial plateaus, 16 creeks, and 25 kilometres of shoreline from 18 kilometres of trails.  The Marsh Boardwalk provides access to the Spencer Creek Delta, one of the largest creek deltas on Lake Ontario.  Cootes Paradise is part of a larger Cootes to Escarpment EcoPark System, a collaborative initiative to protect, restore, and connect almost 1,900 hectares (4,700 acres) of natural lands in the Greenbelt at the western end of Lake Ontario.

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Stop in at the year-round Hamilton Farmers' Market—both a tradition and an institution for Hamiltonians.  Originally founded in 1837, 70 stallholders sell farm-fresh and artisanal products, many of which are grown in the Greenbelt.  Chat with some local farmers and get the inside scoop on what’s local and in season.

TIP: Art and music are alive and well in Hamilton—a vital part of the culture and economy of this city.  As one of the oldest community arts councils in Ontario, Hamilton Arts Council has supported and acted as an advocate for Hamilton’s diverse arts and cultural communities since 1973.  Check out their event listings to find out what’s to be seen and heard in the Hammer tonight.

TIP: Carluke Orchards is a family owned business in Ancaster that features a fresh "from scratch" bakery, orchards, and a gift store.  Pick your own apples and pumpkins when in season and discover the wonderful walking trail through the orchard.  And why not give your legs a break while you take a free wagon ride (on the weekends in September and October).

TIP: Look closely and you’ll discover some new residents that have created quite a stir with local birdwatchers on Cootes Paradise: the first bald eagles to hatch on the Canadian shoreline of Lake Ontario in over 50 years! Scope a view from several viewing towers located around the marsh.

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Additional Information and Resources

Our True Nature - Adventure tourism information

Hamilton Halton Brant - Visitor information

Tourism Hamilton - Visitor information

City of Hamilton - Cycling map and Information

Ontario By Bike - Certified bicycle-friendly businesses, information, and maps

Waterfront Trail - Download maps of the Waterfront Trail section across Hamilton

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Burkhard's Blog: Ted Arnott's Green Legacy Programme

posted in CEO Blog | Jul 06, 2016

One thing you’ll notice about the Greenbelt – whether you’re walking, cycling or driving – is the immense numbers of trees. In fact the Greenbelt is home to an estimated 200 million trees, and they do a lot more than provide a shady place to rest. The Greenbelt’s forests capture and filter water, absorb air pollution, support crop pollination, and store and sequester carbon. These ‘eco-services’ are worth an estimated $1 billion – and the trees provide them for free.

By entering my email above I consent to receive emails containing information about the Greenbelt and the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation. I may revoke my consent by unsubscribing.