Agriculture Profile Brochure

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Agriculture by the Numbers Web Brochure

Download the two page brochure of our latest agriculture study to get the 101 on farming in the Greenbelt.

Released in October 2014, the Greenbelt Foundation study Agriculture by the Numbers captures the changes in agriculture from 2001 to 2011 and highlights the natural and locational advantages of farming in Ontario’s Greenbelt

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Agriculture by the Numbers: Understanding the Greenbelt’s Unique Advantages

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Agriculture by the Numbers: Understanding the Greenbelt’s Unique Advantages

The latest study from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation captures the changes in agriculture from 2001 to 2011 and highlights the natural and locational advantages of farming in Ontario’s Greenbelt.

The report, Agriculture by the Numbers: Understanding the Greenbelt’s Unique Advantages, outlines changes in agriculture over time in the Greenbelt, compared to the Greater Golden Horseshoe and Ontario. Using data from Statistics Canada’s 2001, 2006, and 2011 Census of Agriculture, the paper looks at key variables such as number of farms, area farmed, use of farmland, production levels, and farm revenue.   

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Bruce Peninsula Conservation and Stewardship Plan

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For the full report, please visit bpba.ca.

In September 2012, the Bruce Peninsula Biosphere Association initiated a project to develop a Community Conservation and Stewardship Plan for the Bruce Peninsula through funding from the Friends of the Greenbelt FoundationThis project has brought together the vast local knowledge and expertise of the community to better understand the Bruce Peninsula’s biodiversity and the critical environmental issues it faces. It has provided a forum for community dialogue and learning, leading to a strategic, place-based action plan to protect, restore and benefit from the region's biodiversity. The full version of the plan is not yet released. 

Please visit bpba.ca for updates and full report.

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Cootes to Escarpment Park - Phase 2

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 Cootes to Escarpment Park System Phase II - 978 KB

The Cootes to Escarpment Park System Conservation and Land Management Strategy report summarizes the recommendations from our consultations with stakeholders, the general public and specialists working for conservation land owning agencies about how the park system could be organized. It was made available in draft form for consultation and comment by the public at our Open House in February, 2009 (see below), and our Stakeholder Advisory Committee meeting in April, 2009. Editorial work and layout was completed and the final version of the report released in November 2009 as Cootes to Escarpment Park System Conservation and Land Management Strategy, which is often referred to as the Phase II report.

For more information, please visit cootestoescarpmentpark.ca.

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Best Practices Guide to Natural Heritage Systems Planning

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 Best Practices Guide to Natural Heritage Systems Planning – 6 MB

Natural heritage systems planning is about maintaining, restoring and enhancing ecologically sustainable and resilient landscapes. It is a strategic approach to addressing biodiversity loss, land use change and the uncertainties of climate change so that we always have clean air, clean water and a rich diversity of plant and animal life to sustain present and future generations. Natural heritage systems planning seeks to engage communities and educate citizens about the many benefits that nature provides and about nature's fundamental place in supporting social and economic health.

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Priced Out: Understanding the factors affecting home prices in the GTA

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pdf-icon.png Priced Out: Understanding the factors affecting home prices in the GTA – 1MB

Royal Bank of Canada and the Pembina Institute’s Home Location Study released in 2012 found that over 80 per cent of Greater Toronto Area residents would give up a large home and yard to live in a "location-efficient"neighbourhood that is transit-friendly, walkable and offers shorter commute times. However, more than 70 per cent of residents in the GTA live where they do because of affordability rather than preference.

Priced Out is a follow-up study researched and written by the Pembina Institute, co-published by RBC, that explores the factors contributing to rising home prices in the GTA, and how homebuyers are being "priced out" of location-efficient options.

 

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Farming in Ontario's Greenbelt: Possibility Grows Here

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pdf-icon.png Farming in Ontario's Greenbelt: Possibility Grows Here – 1MB

Co-authoured by professor Wayne Caldwell, of the University of Guelph, and recognized expert on agricultural and rural planning issues, Farming in Ontario’s Greenbelt: Possibility Grows Here, provides recommendations to ensure economic prosperity and viability of farming in Ontario.

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Canada's Wealth of Natural Capital: Rouge National Park

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pdf-icon.png Canada's Wealth of Natural Capital: Rouge National Park – 5.9 MB

The purpose of this study is to estimate the economic value of the ecosystem services and benefits provided by various types of ecosystem and land uses found within the region.

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Carbon in the Bank: Ontario's Greenbelt and its Role Mitigating Climate Change

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pdf-icon.pngCarbon in the Bank: Ontario's Greenbelt and its Role Mitigating Climate Change – 3.81 MB

This report is the sixth in a series in a series that studies natural capital and ecosystem services in Canada's major urban centres. It highlights the important role that the Ontario Greenbelt's forests, wetlands, and agricultural soils play in capturing and storing vast amounts of carbon. A principle goal of the report is to bring the importance of the Greenbelt as an instrument of climate change mitigation into relief by translating these essential ecosystem services into economic values. The report also examines a number of threats to the long-term ability of the Greenbelt to serve this climate regulation function and argues that Ontario's climate change policy framework should be revised to strengthen its ability to protect essential functions and even enhance the Greenbelt's natural capacities as a carbon sink. 

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Evaluating the Economic Benefits of Greenbelt Assets

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 pdf-icon.png Evaluating the Economic Benefits of Greenbelt Assets – 3.47 MB

Produced by Econometric Research Limited, this study identifies, quantifies and showcases the economic contributions of the Greenbelt on the provincial economy and local areas dependent on its resource base. It provides objective, meaningful and sound estimates of the economic contributions of the main economic activities in, or based on, the natural capital base of the Greenbelt.

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