Durham

Durham

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As you pedal across the working landscape of Durham Region, pay a visit to some of the many farm stops or farmers’ markets along the way to taste the local flavour of fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, honey, and much more.  From Lake Simcoe to Lake Ontario, Durham is an agricultural powerhouse.

Discover the rural charm in Durham as the Greenbelt Route links you to historic towns, from Uxbridge to Orono.  For a break from the bike, hop aboard the York-Durham Heritage Railway for a relaxing ride through the picturesque Oak Ridges Moraine in a 1919 Pullman coach. Tour majestic estates and enchanting gardens, preserved and animated to sweep you into another era for an experience you’ll not soon forget.

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Inspired by generations of local artists and musicians, this creative community is thriving in Durham Region. From inspired galleries to skilled artisans, there is an abundance of art and culture to explore.  Consider getting to know Durham Region’s professional and emerging artists by timing your visit with a local studio tour.

TIP: Uxbridge is known as the Trail Capital of Canada, boasting such highlights as the Trans Canada Trail through Glen Major Forest, right off the Greenbelt Route. Bring your knobby tires, kick back, and ride the woods—the air has never been fresher!

TIP: Slip off the Greenbelt Route to explore Port Perry, a lovely four-season resort town rich in historic architecture, and humming with excitement. With a wide assortment of shops and restaurants you can try on the latest fashion, grab a book and cup of coffee, or peruse the antique shops. To satisfy your rumbling stomach, make sure to stop into one of Port Perry’s many restaurants, or pick up some fresh and delicious Greenbelt-grown food from the Port Perry Farmers’ Market.

TIP: Tyrone Mill was built in 1846 as a flour mill supplying flour to markets in England and the United States. The facility is one of the very last active mills in the Greenbelt, and now mills both flour and lumber and houses a small bakery. The belts, pulleys, and line shafts in the mill all run off of renewable run-of-river power which is protected by the Greenbelt.

TIP: Visit the Bowman family store: Gallery on the Farm, a unique fusion of farm fresh products and local art. With many local artisans selling their wares from here, take some time to immerse yourself in the philosophy of “local”.

TIP: Take a hike through the rolling hills of the Greenbelt’s Glen Major Forest to find yourself on a narrow trail that winds under towering hardwood trees. Tread lightly as you pass biologically diverse wetlands and weave your way between the gentle slopes.

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Additional Information and Resources

Central Counties - Visitor Information

Port Perry BIA - Visitor information

Durham Cycle Tours Map (PDF)

Durham Tourism – Visitor information

Ontario By Bike - Certified bicycle-friendly businesses, information, and maps

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Burkhard's Blog: Ted Arnott's Green Legacy Programme

posted in CEO Blog | Jul 06, 2016

One thing you’ll notice about the Greenbelt – whether you’re walking, cycling or driving – is the immense numbers of trees. In fact the Greenbelt is home to an estimated 200 million trees, and they do a lot more than provide a shady place to rest. The Greenbelt’s forests capture and filter water, absorb air pollution, support crop pollination, and store and sequester carbon. These ‘eco-services’ are worth an estimated $1 billion – and the trees provide them for free.

By entering my email above I consent to receive emails containing information about the Greenbelt and the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation. I may revoke my consent by unsubscribing.