Northumberland

Northumberland

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Northumberland is located on the eastern edge of the Greenbelt, halfway between the bustling city of Toronto and history-rich Kingston.  Spend some time along historic King Street in Cobourg before you set off to ascend through acres of rolling pastures and wooded trails of the Oak Ridges Moraine. Friendly locals from Alderville and Roseneath have tonnes to offer, or simply drape your legs off the docks of Rice Lake for a refresh before setting out for Port Hope, another lovely town and your gateway to the west.

Find sweeping views in all directions as you scale the Oak Ridges Moraine around the northernmost point on the Greenbelt Route: Alderville First Nation.  Here, venture off the Greenbelt Route by just a few minutes to find yourself in characteristic fire ecology.  This is Black Oak Savanna, which before European settlement was an extensive and often dominant part of the local ecosystem.  Fires set deliberately by First Nations ensured that only trees with a high tolerance for fire, principally black oak, were able to survive. Grassland savanna areas resulted, providing habitat for many animals including bison, elk, and white-tailed deer.  This is why Rice Lake is known locally as Pemadashdakota, or "lake of the burning plains".  Visit the Alderville First Nation Black Oak Savanna Ecology Centre to find out more.

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  • Greenbelt Route Maps of Northumberland County

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    Rolling hills surrounded by water makes Northumberland the perfect outdoor adventure playground. Touch the treetops in the Ganaraska Forest from a zip-line experience like no other, spend an afternoon angling for bass, walleye, or muskie on the sparkling waters of Rice Lake, or pull up to a local restaurant for a tasty meal.  Go beyond simply seeing the sights here, and fulfill your experiential desires.  Get out and play!

    TIP: Take an extra half day to experience Treetop Trekking in the Ganaraska Forest.  Or spend the night nearby and hit the treetops at night for a Night Trek!

    TIP: Described as “one of the most remarkable monuments in the whole of Canada,” the Alderville War Monument “was the first erected in Canada to commemorate the service of Indians in the First World War.”  It now also commemorates the contributions made by the Alderville First Nation during WWII, the Korean War, and in peacetime.

    TIP: At 32 kilometres long and five kilometres wide, Rice Lake is the largest water body on the Trent–Severn Waterway.
    TIP: The Butter Tart is a phenomenon taking Northumberland County by storm.  As of 2015 there were 37 local bakery across the County. Go ahead—treat yourself!

    TIP: Start from one of our three staging areas in Northumberland, in Port Hope, Cobourg, or Alderville.  Locate the trailhead signs on our maps and take in the GreenbeltRoute from here.

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Burkhard's Blog: Ted Arnott's Green Legacy Programme

posted in CEO Blog | Jul 06, 2016

One thing you’ll notice about the Greenbelt – whether you’re walking, cycling or driving – is the immense numbers of trees. In fact the Greenbelt is home to an estimated 200 million trees, and they do a lot more than provide a shady place to rest. The Greenbelt’s forests capture and filter water, absorb air pollution, support crop pollination, and store and sequester carbon. These ‘eco-services’ are worth an estimated $1 billion – and the trees provide them for free.

By entering my email above I consent to receive emails containing information about the Greenbelt and the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation. I may revoke my consent by unsubscribing.