York

York

Photo-Holland_Aerial-2015-11-15-GB-Photo-Contest-Finalists_c_MichaelMarnett_HollandRiver.jpg

Bustling communities and scenic countryside meet in York Region. Pay a visit to an agricultural fair or stroll through the historic downtowns of Schomberg, Newmarket, or Stouffville. Take a break from the Greenbelt Route and experience the rich cultural diversity of retail and dining opportunities in these communities. With over 60 museums and galleries, and more than 125 performing arts festivals and events, York Region is a treasure to behold.

As you pedal through the Greenbelt Route in York Region, you’ll find over 2,070 hectares of forest as well as farms, wetlands, and kettle lakes. Kettles are depressions left behind after partially-buried ice blocks melt.  The community of Musselman Lake is on one of these kettle lakes, a vibrant community and an ideal place to take a break.  Have lunch on the patio at Fishbones, stop for ice cream at the Coolest Little Ice Cream Shop at the Cedar Beach Variety Store, or indulge in fine chocolate at Charlinda Belgian Chocolates & Café.  And of course, be sure to take a refreshing dip in the lake!

Photo-MainSt-Flowers-2012-07-06-Whitchurch-Stoufville-014.jpg

Photo-Cyclist_Hay_Bale-2015-08-18_Great_Waterfront_Trail_Adventure_2015_Greenbelt_Route_Special_Edition_c_Simon_Wilson_230.jpg

The Holland Marsh is an extraordinarily productive region of Greenbelt and Ontario farmland, famous for its rich black soil that feeds the province’s market for carrots, potatoes, and greens. East from Schomberg, you will skirt the south end of this virtual bread basket, and head just a few kilometres north for sweeping views up the marsh to Lake Simcoe.

TIP: Sample the Greenbelt Beer from King Brewery, where you will find an unprecedented combination of Old World craft brewing combined with the freshness of local ingredients. They also deliver, so consider sending yourself a few bottles for when you get back to the comfort of your own home!

TIP: Pedal off the Greenbelt Route to spend the day at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection where you will find over 6,000 Canadian works, including First Nations and Inuit art, and many original pieces from the famous Group of Seven. This also happens to be the birthplace of Ontario’s Greenbelt, where in 2005 a speech declaring the Greenbelt Act was delivered to roaring applause that just wouldn’t stop.

TIP: North of Stouffville, along the York-Durham townline, reach for the skies at the highest point along the Greenbelt Route—a remarkable 360 meters above sea level.

TIP: Before dropping into the valley of the picturesque town of Kettleby, make a farm stop at Round the Bend Farm market.  Look for asparagus in May, new potatoes, zucchini, and peas in June, and as the summer progresses watch for ears of sweet corn!

TIP: Take note as the Greenbelt Route crosses Yonge Street, the subject of a controversial claim as “the World’s Longest Street”. Indeed, the Guinness Book of World Records published Yonge Street’s status as the true record until 1999.  The famous Yonge Street is also referenced in Greenbelt Harvest Picnic favourite Bruce Cockburn’s “Coldest Night of the Year” as well as K-OS’ “Crabbuckit”.

Photo-Cyclist-NokiidaTrail-Wetland-2015-08-18-Great-Waterfront-Trail-Adventure-2015-Greenbelt-Route-Special-Edition_c_Simon-Wilson-237.jpg

Additional Information and Resources

Central Counties - Visitor Information

York Region - Cycling map and information

Ontario By Bike - Certified bicycle-friendly businesses, information, and maps

Photo-Fish-Jumping-2014-04-22-Rainbow-Trout---Etienne-Brule-Park-015.jpg

Love water? Help protect more of it.

Pledge your support and become a Friend of the Greenbelt today!

By entering my email above I consent to receive emails containing information about the Greenbelt and the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation. I may revoke my consent by unsubscribing.

Burkhard's Blog: Ted Arnott's Green Legacy Programme

posted in CEO Blog | Jul 06, 2016

One thing you’ll notice about the Greenbelt – whether you’re walking, cycling or driving – is the immense numbers of trees. In fact the Greenbelt is home to an estimated 200 million trees, and they do a lot more than provide a shady place to rest. The Greenbelt’s forests capture and filter water, absorb air pollution, support crop pollination, and store and sequester carbon. These ‘eco-services’ are worth an estimated $1 billion – and the trees provide them for free.

By entering my email above I consent to receive emails containing information about the Greenbelt and the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation from the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation. I may revoke my consent by unsubscribing.