Protecting Natural Core Areas and Corridors in the Spirit and Practice of Reconciliation (Phase 2)

Ontario Nature is advancing the protection of natural core areas and connection corridors throughout the GGH.

Feb 06, 2020   •   Grant, Green Infrastructure

Protecting Natural Core Areas and Corridors in the Spirit and Practice of Reconciliation (Phase 2)
Ontario Nature
ontarionature.org

$50,000 (over 1 year)
Grant Approved: June 24, 2019
Grant Stream: Resilient Greenbelt

This project advances the protection of natural core areas and connecting corridors in the Greater Golden Horseshoe. Central to this project is the acknowledgment of Indigenous rights and responsibilities, and support for the deep connection of Indigenous communities to the region's land and water. The project supports the Federal Government’s high-profile international commitment, Target 1, which mandates the conservation of 17% of land and freshwater in Canada by 2020. On the Bruce Peninsula, Ontario Nature will continue to bring together the Saugeen First Nation, National Park, and other community groups to build relationships and trust regarding conservation stewardship activities. They will also help create a platform for the sharing of Indigenous environmental knowledge, perspectives, and land management strategies. Community partners will collaborate to identify new protected areas and support restoration activities, including landscape connectivity. The importance of building climate-resilient habitats and communities through nature will be a central message communicated through the project. Together with local community organizations and First Nations, Ontario Nature is mapping a series of natural cores and corridors to identify new priorities for land protection, reduce forest fragmentation, and strengthen biodiversity.

In close collaboration with Indigenous groups, Ontario Nature is advancing the protection of natural core areas and connection corridors throughout the Greater Golden Horseshoe.

Indigenous partners include the Saugeen-Ojibway Nation, Chippewas of Nawash, Alderville First Nation, Curve Lake First Nation, Hiawatha First Nation, Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation, Georgina Island First Nation, Chippewas of Rama First Nation, Beausoleil First Nation, and Georgian Bay Metis Council. Non-Indigenous partners include the National Park, Ontario Heritage Trust, Bruce Trail Conservancy, Couchiching Conservancy, conservation authorities, and others. Specific activities include in-depth GIS analysis of protected-area opportunities on Crown, municipal and private lands, in order to determine how these areas can contribute to broader landscape connectivity. In order to achieve this, 5 workshops will be conducted, geared to educating non-Indigenous stakeholders about treaties and their implications, and developing an agreement about management approaches and land acquisition, including guiding principles, shared objectives, and communications protocols.